Tag Archives: chemistry

Perfume Fact No. 4

extraction

Did you know that supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) extraction is a trending method of obtaining a whole range of new materials that can be used in fragrance and flavor industries. At temperature above 31°C and pressure of 72.9 atm or higher CO2 turns to its supercritical state and becomes a liquid. In this form it can work as a solvent. Such supercritical fluid has the ability to penetrate fruit, flowers or other scented object and draw out the constituents of its smell. When conditions become smaller than those mentioned before, CO2 returns to its gas state – what remains is a pure extract that ideally reflects the odour of the material that was extracted. This method allows the perfumers to utlize new components that enrich the palette and broaden the horizons of perfume art. Have you tried any perfume that indicated a CO2 extract use?

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Perfume Fact No. 3

raindrop

Did you know that the specific, earthy-ozonic-fresh scent that comes after the first rain in a while or after a storm is not a matter of accident? We can experience this scent effect thanks to a fragrance molecule known as geosmin. It’s produced by Streptomyces bacteria and some cyanobacteria that live in the ground. When they die they release said compound. Our noses are very sensitive to this bicyclic alcohol. Modern perfumery utilizes geosmin sometimes but nobody uses bacteria for that – it’s produced synthetically in the lab (the synthesis method is known since 1968).

Do you like the smell of the ground after the rain? Would you like it to be used in perfume more?

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